About The Women’s Library

The Women's Library in Sydney

The Women’s Library in Sydney is a lending library and welcoming community space open to all women.

The library houses a vast collection of books and periodicals about women and written by women. Building the collection started in 1991 and the library first opened in June 1994.  All books in the collection have been donated by the public and specialist publishers, such as Spinifex Press.

Facilities at The Women’s Library include tea and coffee in the kitchen; guest computer and free WiFi; a children’s corner with books and toys; accessible toilet and baby changing room.

The Herland visual art exhibition is held annually to coincide with International Women’s Day, and during the year we organise book talks, film screenings, and community activities. Members can join our virtual events – the monthly Feminist Classics Book Club and a fortnightly meetup celebrating women in film.

Outside operating hours the library space is available to community groups for meetings and workshops. The Women Write Wiki, one of the groups that regularly meets at The Women’s Library, was featured on Wikimedia Australia in March 2021. For four years, this group has been meeting fortnightly at the library to edit, create, and update Wikipedia entries and has created “over 300 new pages on Australian and New Zealand women”. Other community groups that meet at the library include activists, artists, singers, readers, film enthusiasts, as well as support groups specifically for women. Use the Contact Us page to make an enquiry if you are looking for a space for your group.

The library is open four or five days a weeks, depending on staff availability. You’ll find us at 8-10 Brown Street, Newtown. Come in the side gate next to the Newtown Library and walk to the end of the courtyard.

Women who support the aims of The Women’s Library are invited to become members. Membership is affordable at $20 per annum or $5.50 if you are unable to pay the full fee.


Work from Herland III

Some of the work from the Herland III exhibition in 2021.